Why I Eat my Protein first… and… How many times I eat per day.

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Kids and Veggies

Veggie Delights

by Joyce Bauer.

Q: What’s the best way to get my kids to eat vegetables?

Joy Bauer, MS, RD

A: Trying to get children to eat their vegetables can be frustrating — and parents often resort to bribery: “Eat your broccoli and you can have ice cream for dessert.” Unfortunately, this technique teaches our kids that broccoli and other vegetables are less appealing, because their consumption requires a reward. At the same time, this approach positions dessert as the prize, something to be valued over other foods.

Instead, encourage your kids to try at least one small bite each time vegetables are offered, and continue to offer them over and over again. Eventually, as vegetables become more familiar to them, their distaste may wear off. The most important thing you can do, though, is to model good eating behaviors yourself. Pile plenty of vegetables onto your own plate, and let your kids know how much you enjoy them.

by Joyce Bauer.

A Delicious Holiday Treat

A Delicious Holiday Treat

(From the South Beach Diet- Phase 2)

This tasty twist on the traditional apple crisp is the perfect ending to any holiday meal. Made with fresh apples and dried cherries, it’s a healthy way to enhance the holidays.

Holiday Apple Crisp

Description
Warm and fruity, this seemingly familiar apple crisp is spiked with sweet and tangy dried cherries. Fresh or dried, cherries contain impressive amounts of antioxidants, as well as soluble fiber and potassium. Ounce for ounce, dried cherries are higher in nutrients than their fresh counterparts, but they also have more calories, so it’s best to enjoy them in moderation — as you will here.

Prep time: 20 minutes
Cook time: 45 minutes

Makes 12 (1-cup) servings

Ingredients
1/4 cup unsweetened dried cherries
1/2 cup water
1/2 cup old-fashioned rolled oats
1/2 cup trans-fat-free margarine
1/2 cup whole-grain pastry flour
1/4 cup plus 2 tablespoons granular sugar substitute
2 tablespoons ground cinnamon
9 Granny Smith apples, sliced (9 to 10 cups)
2 tablespoons fresh lemon juice

Instructions
Preheat oven to 350°F. Lightly coat a 9″ by 13″ baking dish with cooking spray.

Place cherries and water in a bowl, and soak cherries until ready to use. Meanwhile, combine oats, margarine, 1/4 cup of the flour, 1/4 cup of the sugar substitute, and 1 tablespoon of the cinnamon in a medium bowl; stir until mixture is crumbly.

Toss apples and lemon juice together in a large bowl. Add remaining 1/4 cup flour, 2 tablespoons sugar substitute, and 1 tablespoon cinnamon; stir to combine.

Place apples in baking dish. Pour cherries and soaking water over apple mixture; toss gently to combine. Sprinkle oat topping evenly over fruit. Bake until apples are tender, about 40 minutes. Serve warm.

Nutritional information
Per (1-cup) serving:
150 calories
7 g fat (2 g sat)
23 g carbohydrate
1 g protein
5 g fiber
60 mg sodium

Adjust Your Weight-Loss Strategy With Age

I thought this was a great article. :)

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Adjust Your Weight-Loss Strategy With Age

Learn how aging affects weight loss and the best ways to modify your fitness plans to adjust to changes in your metabolism.

By Madeline Vann, MPH

As you get older, your body doesn’t respond the same way to weight-loss efforts. This aggravating phenomenon occurs primarily because your metabolism is slowing down and you need fewer calories each day. Here’s how to adjust to get back on track.

Weight Gain and Aging: What’s Going On?

“The 40s are very different from the 30s, and the 50s are very different from the 40s as far as your metabolism,” observes longtime dieter Frances Simon of New Orleans. Simon turns 55 this year and says that number is causing her to get serious about achieving her weight-loss goals. “It seems like it’s harder and harder. But, boy, I remember when I was in my 20s — admittedly I was a lot more active, but I had a lot more energy then, too. I would go out dining and drinking a lot when I was in my 20s, but now in my 50s there is no way I would do that. It’s easier for the weight to come on than to try taking it off.”

Simon’s experiences are not unique. With menopause you may find your waist expands a bit, your muscles lose their tone, and you get new fat deposits. Researchers have yet to uncover the reason for these physical changes, but suspect that rapidly shifting hormones affect your body’s makeup.

While the factors that lead to weight gain as we age are the same for men and women (with the exception of menopause), national health data shows that men over age 65 are slightly more likely than women to be overweight. In fact, 76 percent of men ages 65 to 74 are obese, compared to 71.5 percent of women in that age group.

Weight Gain and Aging: Your Changing Body

Here are some of the contributing factors to your unwanted weight gain:

You’re burning less energy. “As you get older, you don’t need as many calories. Part of that is a little bit slower metabolism, but part of it is you’re not rushing around as much. You can’t believe how many calories you don’t need,” says Donna L. Weihofen, RD, MS, health nutritionist at the University of Wisconsin in Madison.

Weihofen says that learning to adjust your diet to your body’s changing needs is a gradual process. She gives her clients guidelines like switching to smaller portions and sharing at restaurants, especially if dining with a spouse who is having his own problems with weight gain.

You’re less active. Many people find they have less energy as they age, but you may also find that life is less demanding than it was in earlier years. Simon says that eating a Mediterranean-style diet, with an emphasis on fruits, vegetables, whole grains, and healthy fats, keeps her feeling full and gives her more energy to exercise.

However, she notes that there is another significant barrier to exercising for older women. “For people my age who want to exercise or get started exercising, I think it’s discouraging to go to a gym where there are lots of younger people,” she says. Simon’s goal is to attend Jazzercise three times a week, a class she enjoys because the participants are her age and older. “Some of those 60-year-olds look pretty fine, too!”

Weight Gain and Aging: How to Fight Back

A study of weight gain prevention in 284 women showed that women who maintained a healthy weight over a three-year period were more likely to:

  • Carefully monitor food intake
  • Avoid a loss of control of their diet (binging, for example)
  • Not feel hungry

The strategies for combating weight gain as you age are the same you’ve used before:

  • Count your calories
  • Eat a hunger-busting diet rich in fruit, vegetables, whole grains, and healthy fats
  • Keep fat intake below 30 percent of your calories
  • Be physically active, at least 30 minutes a day, five days a week (more if possible)

Aging doesn’t mean you are destined for weight gain — just step up your diet and exercise routine to stay on track!

Weekend Splurging Done Right

By Madeline Vann, MPH
Medically reviewed by Christine Wilmsen Craig

Researchers tracking 48 adults in a weight program for a year found that they ate, on average, 200 calories more on Saturdays, the most dangerous day for weight management. Over time, those 200 extra calories add up to a few pounds gained over the course of a year — not the goal of a maintenance program!

While everyone deserves a day off, you need to be careful not to overdo it. You don’t want to consume too many calories and slip back into the patterns that caused your weight gain in the first place. Maintaining a healthy weight means keeping up with the smart eating habits and lifestyle changes that enabled you to drop those pounds in the first place. The lion’s share of your daily maintenance calories should be spent on nutritious foods every day.

Weekend Calories: Indulge in Moderation


“Sometimes we need it. If you have been really good during the week, it helps to know that at least one day a week you can eat those foods you are avoiding on those other days,” says Donna L. Weihofen, RD, MS, health nutritionist at the University of Wisconsin in Madison, Wisc.

So how do you splurge without destroying your healthy habits? Weihofen, who admits to having a sweet tooth, advises keeping an eagle eye on calorie counts. Your reward can make or break your weight-management plan. A rich chocolate fudge sundae, for instance, can easily add up to 1,000 calories or more — calories that probably equal half of your daily allotment. That’s a large number to compensate for with extra exercise or cutting back on calories at other meals.

Don’t let your weekend turn into a food wasteland. A few smart steps can help you indulge without the calories or guilt:

  • Share that fudge sundae with your spouse or kids.
  • Go for tiny tastes, like a mini-cheesecake instead of an entire slice, or a single square of chocolate instead of a whole bar.
  • Eat a healthy breakfast to control your appetite.
  • Eat more whole grains, fruit, and veggies as your day gets started so that you’ll feel full longer and feel satisfied with small splurges.
  • Split an entrée or skip the bread basket when eating out, especially if you want a taste of dessert.
  • Limit your alcohol — drink water or another calorie-free beverage between drinks — or apply those calories to a food you’d enjoy more.

Weihofen adds that it is important not to allow yourself to feel so deprived of the foods you love that you throw calorie caution to the wind come Saturday. “If you really have a taste for something, budget it in,” she says. This may require a little research in terms of calories and portion sizes, but is worth it in the long run if you are able to stick to your game plan seven days a week.

I thought this was a very good article and some tips to keep in mind on that splurge day!

Clifta Coulter Perez

Reno Personal Fitness Trainer and Nutrition Coach

Win FREE Nutrition & Training with Clifta

Buy Raffle Tickets and Help Clifta get to the USA and represent TEAM PHAT!

If you Win…
You’ll get a Training Program and Nutrition Plan from Clifta!

In ONLY 4 months…

Go from this… 121 lbs.


To This… 102.2 lbs.

Nicole Did! And YOU can too!

**Winner will receive 3 months of Nutrition Plans and 3 months of On-line training!

(If you live in the Reno area… you have a choice to do either on-line or personal training. If you choose personal training you will get 2 sessions per week for 1 month. Equals 8 sessions.)

(If one of my current clients win… you can’t use these sessions in place of what you already do. You can add them as extra sessions per week.)

Click on links below to purchase your TODAY!

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September 20, 2010!

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Lose Body Fat with this Basic Nutrition Plan!!!

Just wanted to list some really clean & healthy sources of proteins & carbs.

Follow these nutrition guidelines & tips and watch the body fat melt away! Good nutrition is about 70% of it. The rest is your cardio and your training regiman. All combined together in a 3 tier approach… gives you results like these!

Nicole Augustine- 30 years old and Mother of 3! (April 2010 to August 2010)

Before photos= 121 lbs.  —-   After photos= 102.2 lbs.

Me, Clifta Perez- 42 years old (February 2010 to August 2010)

Before photos= 23.6% Body fat  ——  After photos= 8.2% Body fat

This approach below will get you headed in the right direction!

Proteins

Egg Whites

Egg Beaters

Chicken Breast

Turkey Breast

Salmon (can)

Tuna (can)

Orange Roughy

Tilapia

Cod

Flank

Carbs

Oatmeal

Plain Ricecakes

Brown Rice

Potatoes

Sweet Potatoes

Yams

Pasta (occasionally, as a treat)

My Favorite Veggies

Broccoli

Spinach

Carrots

Zuchinni

Green Beans

Asparagus

*I eat about every 2.5 to 3 hours and usually have a protein, carb, & veggie with every meal except my last meal before bed… no carbs.

Examle:

Meal 1: Protein + Carb + Veggie

Meal 2: Protein + Carb + Veggie

Meal 3: Protein + Carb + Veggie

Meal 4: Protein + Carb + Veggie

Meal 5: Protein + Veggie Only

Meal 6: Protein + Veggie Only (or sometimes just a low carb, low fat protein drink)

Another Option (if the above seems like too much)

Meal 1: Protein + Carb + Veggie

Snack

Meal 2: Protein + Carb + Veggie

Snack

Meal 3: Protein + Carb + Veggie

Meal 4: Low fat, Low carb Protein Drink

More Notes…

*I also use stevia, ketchup, bar-b-que sauce, fat free dressing, & spices that contain NO SALT.

*I don’t use butter, mayonaise, or sugar.

*I drink about 1.5 to 2 gallons of water per day. If you’re not used to drinking water, a good rule of thumb is to drink 1/2 your weight in ounces. I also use crystal light, tea, coffee (1 cup in A.M.), & diet pepsi (maybe 1/2 to 1 per day).

These nutrition guidelines should get you started and moving in the right direction! If you’d like a nutrition program designed for your specific needs with proper supplements… email me at cliftafit@yahoo.com and we’ll get you set up on your own program tailored just for you!

Individualized Nutrition Programs are very reasonable and are as follows…

$75 for the initial Plan and $30 for updates. If you take one of my bootcamps or personal train with me you get a discount on the nutrition plans… then it’s only $50 for the initial Plan and $15 for updates. Updates are done about every 3-5 weeks. This keeps you from getting bored and also keeps your body constantly changing.

Thank you,

Clifta Coulter Perez

Reno Fitness Trainer

Reno Bootcamp Instructor (teaching 2 locations now)

Phat Physiques in Reno